Theme: Conservation / Restoring Ecosystems / Biodiversity

Thursday, November 11th

Building on their highly influential “Dirt Trilogy” (Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations; The Hidden Half of Nature; and Growing A Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life), geologist David Montgomery and biologist Anne Biklé will preview their forthcoming book, You Are What Your Food Ate. They’ll share the growing body of scientific evidence underlying how soil health dramatically affects the health of crops and animals, and ultimately human bodies. The intimate connections between the life of the soil and the nutritional quality of food points to the profound importance of farming practices that can imbue the human diet with the nutrients and compounds that underpin health, or rob us of them. They will discuss how a growing vanguard of farmers pioneering regenerative practices is proving that farming practices that are good for the land are good for us too.

November 11th | 11:42 am to 11:59 am

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Keynote


David R. Montgomery
Professor of Geomorphology
University of Washington
Anne Biklé
Biologist, Avid Gardener and Author

The conditions that make life possible are rapidly changing. Reckoning with this reality on the cusp of another dry season that may very well ravage his community, 30-year old filmmaker Emmett Brennan embarks on a remarkable journey to find stories of hope and healing. Emmett sets out to walk 200 miles next to the iconic but aging Los Angeles aqueduct, where he encounters ecological iconoclasts, Indigenous voices, and permaculture designers who are challenging the status quo on how we use Earth’s most precious resource. The film delves into a profound and far reaching look at our relationship with water and offers a vision for how to radically redesign our lives around it.

Reflection: a walk with water takes a refreshing approach to confronting our current environmental and systematic troubles, showing how Los Angeles and other parts of California are bellwethers for change. The film features original music from multiple Grammy winner, Jacob Collier, who is Executive Music Producer of the film. With voices and stories that speak to today’s younger generations, Reflection is both a personal meditation on water as well as a practical road map for positive change.

November 11th | 6:30 pm to 7:45 pm

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Friday, November 12th

InhabitantsAn Indigenous Perspective tells a story of America’s troubled past and hopeful future as it follows five Native American peoples (Hopi, Blackfeet, Menominee, Karuk, Hawaiian) living in very different ecosystems as they each seek, after centuries of colonization’s disruptions, to restore their ancient relationships with the land to forge ahead with effective climate-change adaptation strategies. (Inhabitants, a collaborative project of the INHABIT Films Production Company, a Tribal Advisory Board, the Kalliopeia Foundation, the Namaste Foundation, and the Social Good Fund, was directed by Costa Boutsikaris and Anna Palmer; with Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee, executive producer; and Roderick Spencer and Tom Sargent, co-producers).

November 12th | 6:30 pm to 7:45 pm

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Saturday, November 13th

Suzanne Simard is one of the planet’s most influential, groundbreaking researchers on plant communication and intelligence. As Professor of Forest Ecology at the University of British Columbia and the author of the bestselling book, Finding the Mother Tree, she has revealed the highly complex ways trees interact and communicate, including using below-ground fungal networks that contribute to forests’ resiliency, adaptability and recovery. Her research has far-reaching implications for how to manage and heal forests from human impacts, including climate change. In this dynamic presentation, she will discuss the dire global consequences of logging old-growth rainforests, and nature-based solutions that combine Western science and Indigenous knowledge for preserving and caring for these invaluable forest ecosystems for future generations.

November 13th | 11:11 am to 11:28 am

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Keynote


Suzanne Simard
Professor of Forest Ecology
University of British Columbia


For all the ink and pixels spilled over the past year on political infighting about what qualifies as “infrastructure,” one of the most notable omissions has been any real mention of the natural world. The biosphere we all inhabit is, fundamentally, the infrastructure for life itself. As we know all too well, humanity has, for the most part, neglected, destroyed and actively pillaged many of the natural systems that support our continued existence by cooking the climate, unleashing a looming micro-plastic apocalypse, triggering a tragic global decline in all biodiversity benchmarks and more. What will it take to turn our attention towards the rebuilding of our natural infrastructure, for the benefit of all life and human society? How can built infrastructure elegantly and respectfully engage with and support nature? The answers are not easy, and our understanding of these systems is only just scratching the surface of the evolutionary timescales that nature functions on. However, we know enough to get started – and, unsurprisingly, it often begins with letting nature lead. Join experts and leaders as we dive into what a more enlightened, effective, biophilic and biomimetic infrastructure conversation needs to look like.

With: award-winning environmental journalist and author of Eager: The Surprising Secret Lives of Beavers and Why They Matter, Ben Goldfarb; Pyrogeographer and Assistant Professor in the Management of Complex Systems Department at UC-Merced, Dr. Crystal Kolden; and Ariel Whitson, Director of Education and Community at TreePeople.  Moderated by Teo Grossman, Bioneers’ Senior Director of Programs & Research.

November 13th | 12:45 pm to 2:00 pm

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Panelists


Ben Goldfarb
Journalist and Author
Ariel Whitson
Director of Education and Community
TreePeople
Crystal Kolden
Assistant Professor of Fire Science
Management of Complex Systems Department at UC-Merced
Teo Grossman
Senior Director of Programs and Research
Bioneers

We humans tend to look mostly around, sometimes up, and occasionally down, but even then, only at the surface of things. It turns out, however, that all of life on Earth actually depends on the extraordinarily dynamic life hidden beneath our feet, in the incredibly complex interrelationships of plants, bacteria, fungi, insects and minerals that make our continued existence above ground possible. In this session three of the world’s leading specialists on different aspects of those underground ecosystems will share their cutting-edge research. With: Suzanne Simard, Ph.D., Professor of Forest Ecology at the University of British Columbia, one of the planet’s leading experts on the synergies and complexities of forests, and a highly influential, world-renowned pathfinder on the frontier of plant communication and intelligence, and author of the current best-selling Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest; Anne Biklé and David R. Montgomery, a wife and husband team of scientific researchers whose groundbreaking work on the microbial life of soil has revealed its crucial importance to human wellbeing and survival. Dave, a professor of Geomorphology, is the author of the seminal Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations, and Anne, a biologist and science communicator, co-authored The Hidden Half of Nature: The Microbial Roots of Life and Health. Their latest collaboration, What Your Food Ate, to be published spring 2022, tells the sobering and inspiring story of how agriculture can help restore health to the land—and ourselves. Moderated by Bioneers’ Restorative Food Systems Director Arty Mangan

November 13th | 12:45 pm to 2:00 pm

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Panelists


Suzanne Simard
Professor of Forest Ecology
University of British Columbia
Anne Biklé
Biologist, Avid Gardener and Author
David R. Montgomery
Professor of Geomorphology
University of Washington
Arty Mangan
Restorative Food Systems Director
Bioneers

Co-Sponsored by the New Leaders Initiative/Brower Youth Awards

The Brower Youth Awards, named after the late, legendary environmental giant, David Brower, are one of the most prestigious prizes for youth activists, and we at Bioneers are delighted to be able to highlight the work of this year’s cohort of winners, an exceptional array of young mobilizers, organizers and paradigm-shifting leaders, who will discuss their activist trajectories, the challenges they face, and their aspirations for the future. Hosted/moderated by: Mackenzie Feldman, founder/Executive Director, Herbicide Free Campus. With: Sonja Michaluk, 18-year old NJ-based young scientist and citizen science activist, founder of the Conservation Communities Initiative, which encourages people to monitor and protect their local aquatic habitats; Peter Pham, 22, San Jose, CA-based environmental and transit justice activist with Turnout4Transit; David Baldwin, 18, Fort Lauderdale-based invasive plant researcher and activist with Everglades Restoration Ambassadors; Artemisio Romero y Carver, an 18-year old, Santa-Fe, NM-based artist, poet and organizer, co-founder of Youth United for Climate Crisis Action (YUCCA) (who was also Santa Fe’s 2020 Youth Poet Laureate!).

November 13th | 12:45 pm to 2:00 pm

VIEW EVENT PAGE

Panelists


Mackenzie Feldman
Founder and Executive Director
Herbicide-Free Campus
David Baldwin
Invasive Plant Researcher and Activist
Everglades Restoration Ambassadors
Sonja Michaluk
Founder
Conservation Communities Initiative
Peter Pham
Transit Justice Activist
Turnout4Transit
Artemisio Romero y Carver
Co-Founder
Youth United for Climate Crisis Action (YUCCA)

From the majestic peaks of the snow-capped Sierra to the parched valley of Payahuunadü, “the land of flowing water,” this stunning film poetically weaves together memories of intergenerational women. Native Americans, Japanese-American WWII incarcerees and environmentalists form an unexpected alliance to defend their land and water from Los Angeles. Featuring breathtaking photography and immersive soundscapes, the film recounts more than 150 years of history, showing how water lured outsiders in and continues to fuel the greed which sucked this once lush place dry. Ann Kaneko, director; Jin Yoo-Kim, producer; Tracy Rector, executive producer. 

November 13th | 6:30 pm to 7:45 pm

VIEW EVENT PAGE