Theme: Participatory/Interactive

Friday, November 12th

Life is made up of an elegant web of interdependent relationships and ecosystems. While we may have been taught that “competition” is the way of the wild, in fact most relationships in the natural world are dedicated to cooperation and mutual benefit. How does nature create and sustain these enduring partnerships? What is life’s secret code for collaboration? This session will reveal deep patterns from the natural world that can teach us about co-evolving for mutual benefit and offer us opportunities to apply nature’s “Four Key Criteria for Enduring Partnerships” to our own collaborative ventures. Come ready to workshop nature’s insights in order to improve partnerships in your own life or work, and to cultivate an attitude of mutuality that can help us achieve a healthy, just, regenerative world. With Toby Herzlich, Biomimicry for Social Innovation.

November 12th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Toby Herzlich
Founder and Director
Biomimicry for Social Innovation

Bioneers brings together a very diverse, discerning, engaged and reflective community, and the curated conversations around crucial topics we have been hosting recently (“Community Conversations”) have proven highly popular and stimulating. Each session begins with a very brief presentation by a noted thought leader as a “conversation starter” to frame the topic, followed by structured group discussion. At the end, a talented spoken word artist “harvests” the essence of what was said in a poetic synthesis and performs it for the group.  

In this session, Anita Sanchez will start us off by drawing from her award-winning book, The Four Sacred Gifts: Indigenous Wisdom for Modern Times, to explain how unity, healing, hope-in-action, and the ability to forgive the unforgivable are the key life-tools (the “four sacred gifts”) we must cultivate if we are to achieve our full potential as a collective life-giving force in the “One Hoop of Life.” We will then engage in facilitated conversation, as we seek to bring our most creative thinking forward, and weave our hearts, minds, and voices into a collective braid.           

With: Anita L Sanchez, Ph.D., (Aztec/Mexican American), deeply experienced trainer/coach, author, member of the Transformational Leadership Council, and Bioneers and Pachamama Alliance board member. Facilitated by: Amy Lenzo, weDialogue and the World Café Community Foundation; David Shaw, Santa Cruz Permaculture and UCSC Right Livelihood College. “Harvester:” Jason Bayani, author, theater performer, Artistic Director, Kearny Street Workshop.

November 12th | 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm

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Panelists


Jason Bayani
Artistic Director
Kearny Street Workshop
David Shaw
Founder
Santa Cruz Permaculture and UCSC Right Livelihood College
Amy Lenzo

weDialogue and the World Café Community Foundation

As we continue to face global uncertainty and move into the darker months of the year, divine darkness itself offers an invitation to our collective. While the receptive yin, the elementally dark aspect of nature, is not celebrated as much as the active, forceful yang principle, receptivity invites life into unity. From a place of receptivity, we can listen deeply to life and to each other. We can bring the complex and even contradictory aspects of our human experience into a unified field, welcoming diverse opinions, perspectives and needs beyond polarization and binary perception. Receptivity is the path of shared power rather than power over.  Consider Mother Earth herself, the very archetype of receptivity: an all-powerful magnetic force with a north and south pole, holding together the atmosphere, the oceans, and all expressions of life under the unified field of Gaia consciousness. Join Deborah Eden Tull as she draws from the wisdom of Engaged Buddhism, Relational Intelligence and the natural world to offer us a profound experiential teaching on the power of receptivity.

November 12th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Deborah Eden Tull
Author
Relational Mindfulness

Unlike many traditional psychological approaches, somatic practices focus on embodied sensations as much as on the mind. They have proven especially effective in helping address many types of traumas, from purely personal ones to those rooted in collective histories of oppression. In this session, two gifted practitioners, Donaji Lona, a somatics teacher and community social justice activist/organizer who works especially with immigrant communities in the San Francisco Bay Area; and Nazbah Tom (Diné), a Toronto-based somatic practitioner and writer who works with a combination of techniques, including drama therapy, conversation, gestural practices, breath, and bodywork, will share their insights into how we can start working through our traumas with some of the powerful embodied transformation processes that Somatics offers us.

November 12th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Donaji Lona
Teacher
Generative Somatics
Nazbah Tom
Somatic Practitioner and Writer

Weaving Earth’s educational pedagogy critically engages inherited stories of separation and domination, while also responsibly recollecting a deeper human inheritance: stories of interrelationship, belonging, dignity and respect. In this interactive/experiential session, three leading Weaving Earth facilitators will engage in practices and dialogue that nurtures a felt sense of interrelationship with the living planet. With an emphasis on the language of the birds, pattern awareness and practices that nurture the regeneration of intuition, this session seeks to instigate a “community of practice” centered in enchantment, “attention liberation” (adrienne maree brown), and eco-social repair.  With tayla shanaye; brontë velez; and Lauren D. Hage.

November 12th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Lauren D. Hage
Executive Director and Co-Founder
Weaving Earth Center for Relational Education
tayla shanaye
co-director and educator
Weaving Earth
brontë velez
educator
Weaving Earth

Saturday, November 13th

Bioneers brings together a very diverse, discerning, engaged and reflective community, and the curated conversations around crucial topics we’ve been hosting recently (“Community Conversations”) have proven highly popular and stimulating. Each session begins with a very brief presentation by a noted thought leader as a “conversation starter” to frame the topic, followed by structured group discussion. At the end, a talented spoken word artist “harvests” the essence of what was said in a poetic synthesis and performs it for the group.  

Global Warming Woman is a totem for our changing world—a fierce, protective warrior, deeply connected to Earth Mother, seeking balance on the Hoop of Life. Right now, she’s on fire, kindling the injustices of the past, demanding respect and blazing a passionate path for the future. Join us to look at the collective and generational history of suppression and misuse of power, and how it impacts our bodies, our health, our relations, and our Earth.

Together, we’ll explore strategies and practices for cooling the fire within, for conflict resolution, for addressing addictions, for safe anger release, and for reconciliation. With conversation-starter Ruby Gibson, Th.D. (Lakota, Ojibway, Mestiza), co-founder and Executive Director of Freedom Lodge and author of My Body, My Earth: The Practice of Somatic Archaeology. Facilitated by: Amy Lenzo, weDialogue and the World Café Community Foundation; David Shaw, Santa Cruz Permaculture and UCSC Right Livelihood College. Harvester: Jahan Khalighi, spoken word poet, youth educator and community arts organizer.

November 13th | 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm

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Panelists


Ruby Gibson
Executive Director
Freedom Lodge
Jahan Khalighi
Programs & Volunteer Manager
Chapter 510
Amy Lenzo

weDialogue and the World Café Community Foundation
David Shaw
Founder
Santa Cruz Permaculture and UCSC Right Livelihood College

To understand how we steward the land appropriately in harmony with nature and natural forces, it is necessary to understand our relationship to the primal elements and their relationship to each other. Join a discussion that will bridge ecological science, permaculture and Traditional Ecological Knowledge and how they are applied to land management in ways that nurture ecosystem resilience and regeneration. With Permaculturist Penny Livingston; water protector and permaculturist Carmen Gonzales (Diné); and Bill Tripp (Karuk Tribe), Deputy Director of Eco-Cultural Revitalization for the Karuk Tribe. Hosted by Bioneers’ Restorative Food Systems Director Arty Mangan

November 13th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Penny Livingston
Prominent Permaculture Teacher, Designer and Speaker
Carmen Gonzales
Permaculture Designer and Environmental Scientist
Bill Tripp
Deputy Director of Eco-Cultural Revitalization
Karuk Tribe
Arty Mangan
Restorative Food Systems Director
Bioneers

In this experiential, restorative session, Sarah Amsler, Associate Professor of Education, University of Nottingham (UK); and Sonali Sangeeta Balajee, founder, Our Bodhi Project, will help us expand our awareness about how making place for deep rest in our intensely capitalist society can be a powerful, vital practice for healing. Drawing metaphorically from Suzanne Simard’s world-renowned research into the nurturing and “teaching” role “mother trees” play in forest ecosystems, Sonali and Sarah will support us in exploring our own sources of wisdom through experiential, creative practices, opening up new possibilities to what rest and healing can look like in our lives, our communities and our activism. 

November 13th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Sarah Amsler
Associate Professor of Education
University of Nottingham
Sonali Sangeeta Balajee
Founder
Our Bodhi Project

Although we’ve all been taught that “being professional” means suppressing our honest emotions while we’re at work, research shows that this actually leads to a loss in productivity, diminished creativity, and crushing job dissatisfaction. The workplace kicked out the emotions more than a century ago, and as a result has built unhealthy and dysfunctional environments ever since. Because of this, most of us have only worked in “unintentional communities” in which our social and emotional needs are not respected, as well as our needs for basic respect and self-determination. As we all grapple with our pandemic and post-pandemic reality, it’s high time to welcome the genius of the emotions back into the workplace so that we can create respectful, naturally motivating and emotionally well-regulated environments where people and projects can thrive. With: Karla McLaren, M.Ed., social science researcher, founder/CEO of Emotion Dynamics LLC award-winning author of several books, including: The Power of Emotions at Work: Accessing the Vital Intelligence in Your Workplace.

November 13th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Karla McLaren
Founder and CEO
Emotion Dynamics LLC

Although there is far more awareness of and discussion about cultural appropriation, especially regarding Indigenous Peoples, than there was even just a few years ago, there is still a great deal of confusion about what it actually is and how to distinguish a productive interest and affection for another culture from exploitative poaching. In this interactive session, we will unpack the differences between appropriation and appreciation through real life examples, exercises and discussion. We’ll leave the session with the confidence to interact with Native Peoples as a good relative, the know-how to purchase and display Native arts responsibly, and the ability to help others avoid cultural appropriation. With: Cara Romero (Chemehuevi), Director, and Alexis Bunten (Aleut/Yup’ik), Co-Director, of Bioneers’ Indigeneity Program.

November 13th | 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

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Panelists


Alexis Bunten
Co-Director of Bioneers Indigeniety Program
Bioneers
Cara Romero
Co-Director of Bioneers Indigeniety Program
Bioneers