Theme: Climate

Thursday, November 11th

For millennia Indigenous communities have been guardians of their environments, protecting flora and fauna, using their traditional knowledge and wisdom passed down over generations to live in balance within their ecosystems. Today Indigenous peoples safeguard 80% of the biodiversity left in the world, and protecting those lands and waters is crucial to mitigating the climate crisis, because those biodiverse areas are among the planet’s major carbon sinks. Indigenous peoples are the ancestral owners of nearly half of the intact forest left across the entire Amazon Basin. Nemonte Nenquimo, a leader from the Waorani community in Ecuador and a founding member of Indigenous-led nonprofit organization Ceibo Alliance and its partner, Amazon Frontlines, will discuss why respecting Indigenous people’s internationally recognized rights to decide the future of their territories, cultures and lives is critically urgent for the protection of our world’s most important rainforest, our climate, and life on our planet.

November 11th | 11:15 am to 11:32 am

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Keynote


Nemonte Nenquimo
Co-Founder
Ceibo Alliance and Amazon Frontlines

Friday, November 12th

This Congress and Administration offer us the best chance we’ve ever had in the U.S. for real climate action, but it’s far from a done deal and the window for success could be fleeting. What should activists and concerned citizens do now to make sure we don’t let this historic opportunity slip away? Julian Brave NoiseCat, one of North America’s most brilliant emerging multi-disciplinary thought leaders, will share his insights on the current political landscape and the most productive strategies we can adopt to seize this moment. His work cuts across the fields of journalism, policy, research, art, activism and advocacy. He is Vice President of Policy and Strategy at the Data for Progress think tank and a Fellow at the Type Media Center.

November 12th | 11:11 am to 11:28 am

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Keynote


Julian Brave NoiseCat
Director of Green New Deal Strategy
Data for Progress

Alongside Indigenous and frontline communities, young people have been at the forefront of the global climate fight. In this talk, Bill McKibben will explain why older activists not only need to have their backs, but how we can harness the power of the fastest-growing population on earth—people over the age of 60—and move them towards progressive political involvement, foster intergenerational collaboration, and deepen the fight for a fairer, more stable planet.

November 12th | 11:38 am to 11:53 am

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Keynote


Bill McKibben
Founder
350.org

Clayton Thomas-Muller and Julian Brave NoiseCat are nationally and internationally acclaimed Indigenous leaders in the fights against climate change and the accelerating, human-induced destruction of our ecosystems. When they aren’t on the front lines organizing movements to protect the planet, Clayton and Julian work as accomplished writers penning penetrating analyses of the connections between settler colonial capitalism, broken social and political systems, trauma, and environmental disaster. They also happen to have a deep friendship. Join us for an intimate conversation with these two exemplary leaders, as they share the story behind the story about how their lives intersect with their activism and discuss their new projects and their hopes for the future.  

November 12th | 12:45 pm to 2:00 pm

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Panelists


Julian Brave NoiseCat
Director of Green New Deal Strategy
Data for Progress
Clayton Thomas-Muller
'Stop It At The Source' Campaigner
350.org

Presented in Partnership with Sierra magazine

The drumbeats demanding that the fossil fuel giants be held accountable for sparking the climate crisis are getting louder. Here in the U.S., more cities, states, and counties keep filing lawsuits seeking compensation from the oil giants for climate-related damages and to fund adaptation projects. Last spring, a Dutch court found multinational Shell Oil guilty of violating human rights and ordered the company to slash its emissions, and many other international lawsuits against fossil fuel corporations are pending. Join investigative journalist Amy Westervelt, Greenpeace International attorney Michelle Jonker-Argueta, and Carroll Muffett of the Center for International Environmental Laws to learn about the latest twists and turns in the global effort to hold the oil companies accountable for their deception and delay. Moderated by Jason Mark, editor in chief of Sierra magazine. 

November 12th | 12:45 pm to 2:00 pm

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Panelists


Amy Westervelt
Investigative Journalist
Carroll Muffett

Center for International Environmental Laws
Jason Mark
Editor in Chief
Sierra Magazine
Michelle Jonker-Argueta
Attorney
Greenpeace International

Saturday, November 13th

For the Climate Justice Movement to arrive at results that are truly “just,” it must be radically inclusive, which means that its struggles must of course intersect with those of social, racial and gender justice movements, but it also means that other historically disenfranchised groups can’t be excluded, so, for example, the Disability Justice Movement must have a seat at the table. One of this year’s Brower Youth Award winners, Alexia Leclercq, an environmental justice organizer based in Austin TX and NYC, shares her passion about these rarely discussed aspects of intersectionality.

November 13th | 11:33 am to 11:38 am

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Keynote


Alexia Leclercq
Co-Founder
Start: Empowerment

Co-Sponsored by the New Leaders Initiative/Brower Youth Awards

The Brower Youth Awards, named after the late, legendary environmental giant, David Brower, are one of the most prestigious prizes for youth activists, and we at Bioneers are delighted to be able to highlight the work of this year’s cohort of winners, an exceptional array of young mobilizers, organizers and paradigm-shifting leaders, who will discuss their activist trajectories, the challenges they face, and their aspirations for the future. Hosted/moderated by: Mackenzie Feldman, founder/Executive Director, Herbicide Free Campus. With: Sonja Michaluk, 18-year old NJ-based young scientist and citizen science activist, founder of the Conservation Communities Initiative, which encourages people to monitor and protect their local aquatic habitats; Peter Pham, 22, San Jose, CA-based environmental and transit justice activist with Turnout4Transit; David Baldwin, 18, Fort Lauderdale-based invasive plant researcher and activist with Everglades Restoration Ambassadors; Artemisio Romero y Carver, an 18-year old, Santa-Fe, NM-based artist, poet and organizer, co-founder of Youth United for Climate Crisis Action (YUCCA) (who was also Santa Fe’s 2020 Youth Poet Laureate!).

November 13th | 12:45 pm to 2:00 pm

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Panelists


Mackenzie Feldman
Founder and Executive Director
Herbicide-Free Campus
David Baldwin
Invasive Plant Researcher and Activist
Everglades Restoration Ambassadors
Sonja Michaluk
Founder
Conservation Communities Initiative
Peter Pham
Transit Justice Activist
Turnout4Transit
Artemisio Romero y Carver
Co-Founder
Youth United for Climate Crisis Action (YUCCA)

Bioneers brings together a very diverse, discerning, engaged and reflective community, and the curated conversations around crucial topics we’ve been hosting recently (“Community Conversations”) have proven highly popular and stimulating. Each session begins with a very brief presentation by a noted thought leader as a “conversation starter” to frame the topic, followed by structured group discussion. At the end, a talented spoken word artist “harvests” the essence of what was said in a poetic synthesis and performs it for the group.  

Global Warming Woman is a totem for our changing world—a fierce, protective warrior, deeply connected to Earth Mother, seeking balance on the Hoop of Life. Right now, she’s on fire, kindling the injustices of the past, demanding respect and blazing a passionate path for the future. Join us to look at the collective and generational history of suppression and misuse of power, and how it impacts our bodies, our health, our relations, and our Earth.

Together, we’ll explore strategies and practices for cooling the fire within, for conflict resolution, for addressing addictions, for safe anger release, and for reconciliation. With conversation-starter Ruby Gibson, Th.D. (Lakota, Ojibway, Mestiza), co-founder and Executive Director of Freedom Lodge and author of My Body, My Earth: The Practice of Somatic Archaeology. Facilitated by: Amy Lenzo, weDialogue and the World Café Community Foundation; David Shaw, Santa Cruz Permaculture and UCSC Right Livelihood College. Harvester: Jahan Khalighi, spoken word poet, youth educator and community arts organizer.

November 13th | 2:30 pm to 4:30 pm

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Panelists


Ruby Gibson
Executive Director
Freedom Lodge
Jahan Khalighi
Programs & Volunteer Manager
Chapter 510
Amy Lenzo

weDialogue and the World Café Community Foundation
David Shaw
Founder
Santa Cruz Permaculture and UCSC Right Livelihood College